Legislation

Official Short: Energy Supply and Distribution Act of 2015

Long Title: To modernize Federal policies regarding the supply and distribution of energy in the United States, and for other purposes

Sponsors: Sens. Murkowski (R-Alaska), Heitkamp (D.N.D.), Barasso (R-Wyo.), McCain (R-A.Z.), Corker (R-Tenn.), Alexander (R-Tenn.), Risch (R-Idaho), Flake (R-A.Z.), Capito (R-W.Va.), Inhofe (R-Okla.), Rubio (R-Fla.), Lankford (R-Okla.)

THOMAS: https://www.congress.gov/bill/114th-congress/senate-bill/1312?q=%7B%22search%22%3A%5B%22s+1312%22%5D%7D

The Energy Supply and Distribution Act of 2015

S. 1312 ends the 40-year ban on U.S. oil exports and provides for infrastructure development. 

Background

Modernizing federal energy policy for the 21st century is paramount to continuing America’s energy renaissance. Building infrastructure and opening up access to new markets is the best way to enhance energy production and distribute that supply across the country. The technological advancements of the last decade have taken American from a nation of energy scarcity, to a nation of abundance. With this abundance, we have an opportunity to supply the energy Americans need every day as well as helping our friends and allies around the world.

Key Provisions

  • Authorizes exports of all crude oil and condensate produced in the United States without a federal license, on the same basis as exports of petroleum products are currently authorized.
    • An exception is made for oil stored in the Strategic Petroleum Reserve. This provision builds on analysis conducted by the Energy Information Administration, the Congressional Budget Office, the Government Accountability Office, and many other organizations.
  • Directs the Secretary of Energy to improve the understanding of “energy security” across the federal government, drawing also from the President’s National Security Strategy.
  • Authorizes the Secretary to lead interagency efforts on “shared infrastructure” analysis and training related to cross-border energy projects.
  • Authorizes a program requested by EIA to share data with Mexico and Canada on cross-border energy flows.
  • Directs the Department of Energy (DOE) to create a standard definition of “condensate.”
  • Authorizes DOE and Department of the Interior to assess condensate separately from crude oil.
  • Affirms the Commerce Department’s 2014 decision to treat processed condensate as a petroleum product, which may be exported without a license.